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Osteoarthritis and Inflammatory Joint Pain

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Switch to:

Osteoarthritis and Inflammatory Joint Pain

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Shot of a mature doctor examining his patient who is concerned about his knee

Osteoarthritis and Inflammatory Joint Pain

While many types of rheumatological conditions exist, two of the most common are osteoarthritis and inflammatory joint pain. It’s likely that you know someone with one of these conditions, or you might even have one of them yourself. But what exactly are osteoarthritis and inflammatory joint pain, and what can be done to treat them?

When experiencing joint or muscle pain, it might be difficult to decide whether you need to see a doctor. You might even think your discomfort is just temporary and doesn’t indicate any larger overall health issue. But if you’re suffering from persistent joint and muscle pain, or are undergoing evaluation for autoimmune diseases, then you should schedule an appointment with a Rheumatologist. If left untreated, these conditions can permanently damage your health and lead to chronic pain, loss of joint function, bone erosions, and more.

Osteoarthritis, also known as degenerative joint disease, is the most common type of arthritis, affecting over 30 million Americans. 

Osteoarthritis

Osteoarthritis, also known as degenerative joint disease, is the most common type of arthritis, affecting over 30 million Americans. This condition causes a breakdown of cartilage, which results in painful swelling, stiffness, and loss of flexibility of the joints in your hands, knees, hips, or spine.

 

Some of the common risk factors of osteoarthritis include:

  • Family health history 
  • Older age
  • Obesity
  • Joint injuries
  • Gender (more common in women than men)

Inflammatory Joint Pain

Although rarer than osteoarthritis, inflammatory joint pain is still one of the most common rheumatological conditions.

 

Some common types of inflammatory joint pain are:

  • Rheumatoid arthritis: Autoimmune disease where your body's immune system attacks its own joint and cartilage tissue and causes pain, swelling, stiffness, and loss of function in your joints
  • Gout: Sudden, severe attacks of pain in one or more joints, most often in the big toe
  • Pseudogout: Condition similar to gout, mostly affecting the knees or wrists
  • Polymyalgia rheumatica: Muscle pain and stiffness, particularly in the shoulders and hips
close-up hand doctor examining head of patient with knee problems in clinic.

Osteoarthritis and Inflammatory Joint Pain

What Can I Do?

Although there is no cure for osteoarthritis or inflammatory joint pain, it is possible to manage these conditions and live with them comfortably. At AdvantageCare Physicians (ACPNY), our providers can guide you through a range of treatment options, including rest, hot or cold compresses, exercise, stretching, medication, dietary changes, and joint injections. Our providers can also refer you for occupational or physical therapy, or even to a surgeon, depending on the severity of your case.

If you’re experiencing persistent joint pain or think you may be at risk for osteoarthritis or inflammatory joint pain, we encourage you to visit an ACPNY provider as soon as possible. Schedule your next appointment today.