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Stress, Blood Sugar, and Your Body

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Switch to:

Stress, Blood Sugar, and
Your Body

Adult man working with documents and using laptop, at desk inside office building.

Any health care provider will tell you that stress can lead to a variety of serious health issues, including insomnia, high blood pressure, and heart disease. But did you know that stress can also increase your blood sugar levels? If you’re struggling to manage your ongoing stress, you may be putting yourself at greater risk for developing diabetes or severe diabetes-related complications. 

Managing your stress is a very effective way to help lower your blood sugar levels and improve your overall health. 

How does stress increase blood sugar?

Because stress can negatively impact both your physical and emotional health, it can increase blood sugar levels in several ways. On the physical side, stress triggers the release of certain hormones in your body that raise your blood sugar levels, which in the long run can increase your insulin resistance and eventually lead to diabetes. On the emotional side, some people cope with their stress by overindulging in unhealthy foods, which can also increase blood sugar levels if left unchecked.

How can I reduce my stress?

Managing your stress is a very effective way to help lower your blood sugar levels and improve your overall health. Here are a few tips you can try:

  • Exercise, including low-intensity activities like stretching, walking, and yoga
  • Speaking with a friend or loved one you can trust.
  • Meditation
  • Slow and deep breathing
  • Journaling
  • Listening to calm music
  • Seeking professional guidance from a therapist

These stress management tips, along with a healthy diet and an adequate amount of sleep each night, can go a long way toward lowering your blood sugar levels and reducing your risk of diabetes or diabetes-related complications. If you’re struggling with prolonged stress, high blood sugar, or any other health issues, schedule an appointment with your Primary Care Provider (PCP) today to discuss steps you can take to improve your health.

In observance of Memorial Day, most ACPNY offices will be operating on a holiday schedule. For your convenience, select offices will remain open. Learn more.